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Chris:
So, now that we’ve built a journey map, and we’ve validated with customers, we’ve interviewed them, we understand their needs and desires; how do you measure and improve it and know that you’re actually improving their experience?
Kirsty:
Sure. So, as Peter Drucker, the management consultant, famously once said: if you cannot measure it, you can’t improve it. So, it’s very important to ensure that you have the right metrics set-up to make sure that you’re measuring improvements to the journey. At Hootsuite, we have a customer dashboard, which contains the metrics across each stage of the journey that we’re looking to improve, that are grounded in what our customers will see as core improvements to the journey. Obviously, it’s nice to have snapshot of those metrics, but it’s more important to measure those metrics over time. So, let me take an example. If you’re thinking about the acquisition phase of the journey, which a lot of companies have, you know, the buying phase of the journey, maybe you’re measuring conversion, maybe you’re measuring average order value. Don’t just measure data at one snapshot in time, but measure that on a weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual basis. Another example might be the post sale part of the journey. So, if you’reĀ  looking at improving your post sale journey, you might be measuring things such as retention rate, renewal rate, churn, you know, repeat customers if you’re in a more B2C transactional business. And, again, it’s really important to track those metrics over time.
Chris:
And, a lot of metrics, whether it’s sales or maybe marketing metrics of an acquisition piece, they are going across several organizations, how do you ensure that you’re all working together to record that experience and the improvement of that?
Kirsty:
Sure. So, I think the easiest and most important way to do that is actually to align metrics across different business units and teams. So, we have, effectively, three core metrics. One is a shareholder metric; one is a customer metric; and, one is an employee metric. And, those are the same through the entire organization. There are also important linchpin metrics that are shared between teams. So, for example, our product team and our marketing team own our Net Promoter Score and driving improvements to our Net Promoter Score. Our marketing team and our sales team own, you know revenue for example, or our success team and our marketing team or customer marketing team own customer retention, for example. So, by making sure that the cross functional teams really own metrics together, it helps to drive their shared responsibility and accountability for making improvements to the customer experience.
Chris:
You talked a little about the metrics you use and CSAT and NPS being a part of that; when that number moves up and down, how do you know what’s actually correlated with that movement; how do you know what to change?
Kirsty:
Oh, sure. Here, I think it’s really imperative that you look at the qualitative data. To your point, you can see the number moving up or down, but you really have to peel back the onion by reading through the customer comments and understanding what the customers are saying across various different categories and then, again, using with the weighting of those categories and understanding the impact on the business to then determine which pieces to change that have the biggest impact.
Chris:
I want to thank you, Kirsty, for joining us today and sharing her best practices to improve customer experience and showing the impact the customer experience can have across your organization.



Also read: Digital Transformation & the Customer Experience Part II

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Chris Lazzarini

Director of Operations

Chris Lazzarini
Chris Lazzarini

Chris Lazzarini

Director of Operations

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